March 14, 2016

25 Slang Terms Teens Use Online That Parents Need To Know

by

Teen Slang Online

Disclosure: The following post about teen slang and digital parenting is provided as part of my relationship as a Verizon Insider and sharing about digital technology.

When it comes to teens, most parents will probably agree they have their own language. It’s been the case for generations. It’s often associated with societal changes. So it should come as no surprise that with regard to texting and online communication, teens have developed their own shorthand and way of communicating with their peers. Teen slang has been around for generations, and it keeps evolving.

As a parent with a teen who’s not all that interested in texting or social media, I breathe a sigh of relief because I get to put off that layer of being a teen for a little longer.  However, for the past 5 or so years I’ve been the “trusted adult” for several kids in my friends and family circle. If you’re not sure what a “trusted adult” is, it’s a great way to keep an eye on the kids with their knowing but not have mom or dad constantly ‘snooping’. Being the ‘trusted adult’ comes with a number of rules, most importantly not being able to like, comment, or respond publicly to the teen. However, the kids know someone’s watching. And I’m not just watching what they say or do, I’m also watching and reading (and screencapping) what their friends do.

I consider it a privilege to be the ‘trusted adult’. It definitely gives me a front row seat to some very interesting conversations. Unfortunately, over the years the language has changed a bit. What used to be shorthand no longer exists or means something totally different. It’s kind of when your grandma texts you and uses LOL and you think it means ‘Laugh Out Loud’ but she thinks it means ‘Lots of Love’. Pretty benign, really, but I’m sure you’ve seen those articles or posts on social media where mom is telling her adult child that someone died and mom ends every text with LOL. Awkward, sure. But mom or grandma aren’t using the shorthand as a way to avoid ‘prying eyes’ as teens (and tweens) may be doing.

Teens, on the other hand, have always developed a language that may mean one thing to parents who check their kids’ online accounts and something else to their peers. Which is why it’s so important for us to stay up on their teen slang. There are thousands, many of which you may use yourself. Slang such as OOTD (outfit of the day), TBH (to be honest), AFAIK (as far as I know), as well as IDK, LMAO, BAE. But you don’t need to know every one.

25 Teen Slang Terms Parents Need To Know

MOS/POS/SOS – Mom Over Shoulder or Parent Over Shoulder or Someone Over Shoulder

PRW – Parents Are Watching

KPC – Keeping Parents Clueless

PIR/MIR/DIR – Parents in Room, Mom in Room, Dad in Room

MOOS or MOSS – Member of Opposite Sex or Member of Same Sex

ASL (RP) – Age Sex Location (Race) (Picture)

CD9 – Parents Are Around (shorthand for Code9)

HSWM – Have Sex With Me

WYRN – What’s Your Real Name

459 or 143 – I Love You

RU18 – Are You 18?

8 – Oral Sex

GNOC – Get Naked on Camera

IHU or 182 – I Hate You

CU46 or LH6 – See You For Sex or Let’s Have Sex

LMIRL – Let’s Meet In Real Life

SMASH – I Would Have Sex With You

Cook Session – When a group of kids gang up on someone on social media

ILYSM – I Like/Love You So Much

KIK – The Kik App

RDH – Rate Date Hate (How do you rate me; Would you date me; Do you hate me)

TBR – To Be Rude

GOAT – Greatest of All Time

PAP – Post a Picture

Ship – Relationship

I hope you’ll find this helpful to keep you in-the-know when it comes to what your teens and tweens are posting and texting. While some of the teen slang is innocuous, having an idea of what they’re sharing with their friends is important. Keep in mind, these are some of the more common phrases and there is another sub-language used for sexting. Unfortunately, there are no parental controls for monitoring their every online move. Monitoring teens online takes more than just uploading some software and walking away. It takes a ninja-like vigilance, which is not for the faint of heart.

If you have friends or family members that need this information, please share it with them. If you’d like to share this on your social networks, just click the button(s) below and pass it along.

Teen Slang Parents Need To Know

Sara

{ 8 comments }

Alana March 17, 2016 at 3:09 am

Shared. My son is grown and I knew some of these from his teen years – but not as many of them as I should have. This will be a valuable source of information for people I know.

Sara March 17, 2016 at 8:58 am

Thank you for visiting and commenting, Alana. I appreciate your willingness to share my article, as well. Glad to know some of the terms have stayed consistent. That’s helpful to know so we don’t have to keep relearning. But, at the same time, I’m glad you mentioned that some are new because that’s why we need to stay on top of this. Thanks for sharing your insight as someone who’s already been down this road.

Pam@over50feeling40 March 17, 2016 at 5:23 am

Thanks for writing this…I shared on FB. This is important for parents and for high school teachers.

Sara March 17, 2016 at 8:56 am

Thanks for visiting, commenting, and sharing, Pam. I completely forgot that this could be helpful for teachers as well, so thank you for mentioning that.

Mona (aka Moxie-Dude) March 17, 2016 at 12:35 pm

OMG. I’m actually surprised by how many of these I didn’t know! Thanks for sharing this very important (secret) information!

Lisa @ Grandma's Briefs March 17, 2016 at 12:49 pm

I’m so thankful my kids were grown and gone before social media (and texting). Gah! These are fantastic for GRANDparents, too, though, considering how often grandkids hang out with Grandma and Grandpa. Thank you! Pinning!

Haralee March 17, 2016 at 3:48 pm

Thanks for sharing this. I am out of touch!

Kim Jorgensen Gane March 17, 2016 at 5:11 pm

Ugh. It’s all so exhausting to keep up these days. This is coming from someone with grown married daughters who are almost 30. Shared in our middle school parents group in the spirit of all of us working together to help keep our kids safe online. ::sigh::

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